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We at Connelly Law are committed to keeping up with the latest news and events surrounding mesothelioma and asbestos. As doctors and scientific researchers are constantly striving to come up with new methods to treat mesothelioma we believe it is important to keep abreast of these medical breakthroughs. In addition, while proven to cause cancer, asbestos continues to be used throughout the United States today. We make it a priority to keep up to date on asbestos litigation and in order to provide our clients and their families with the best service possible.

Our news center features the latest coverage of topics relating to mesothelioma and asbestos including medical breakthroughs, advocacy programs and pending litigation.

Asbestos: Notice to Employees (Connelly Act, AB 3713)

From UC San Diego

Environment, Health & Safety Office January 2015 State law requires notification to all UCSD personnel of the presence of asbestos in certain building materials used in the construction of University buildings.

Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S) has conducted an extensive survey to identify those areas at UCSD where asbestos containing building materials (ACBM) are present and maintains a database of this information (http://ehs.ucsd.edu/asbestosSurveys/).Contact EH&S for questions about the survey: ehsih@ucsd.edu.

Certain buildings at UCSD, with the exception of those built since 1981, contain non-friable asbestos materials in public access areas. These materials include vinyl asbestos floor tiles and/or linoleum sheet flooring as well as the mastic used to secure them. In addition, some laboratory and machine shop areas have benches and/or fume hoods constructed of transite and/or colorlith. The asbestos in these materials is bonded with vinyl, epoxy, cement or other materials and under normal conditions does not pose any danger to the user. If the material is cracked, drilled, sanded, or otherwise disturbed, however, it could result in the release of asbestos fibers into the air that could present a health risk. Such work must only be performed by trained personnel using proper work practices, containment equipment, and personal protection.

Some other areas contain sprayed-on acoustical material containing asbestos. These materials may be reduced to powder by hand pressure, but do not present a problem as long as they are not disturbed. Only trained workers with the proper equipment should perform work that would have the potential to disturb such materials.

Some fire doors used in stairwell smoke towers and the entrances to mechanical rooms and cores in the larger buildings also contain asbestos. These doors are usually wooden and have a metal label on the inside edge or top identifying them as having a type “B” fire rating or a rating of one hour or greater. As long as these doors are intact, they pose no health risk to building occupants.

Some larger buildings have asbestos materials in areas of restricted public access such as mechanical rooms and cores. Asbestos was not used in air system ductwork. In very few instances, asbestos insulated pipes are in public corridors. As long as the outer canvas cover or metal sheathing on the pipes is intact, the insulation presents no health problem. If the protective covering is disturbed, call the Facilities Management Service Referral Desk (858) 534-2930, to report the problem.

Please disseminate this information to all new employees in your respective departments. As asbestos containing building materials are abated, the database for asbestos is continually updated.