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Residents in Mansfield Concerned about Asbestos Contamination from a Building’s Demolition

Posted on: November 3rd, 2015 by William Connelly

In Mansfield, Louisiana, there is great fear that there is asbestos contamination from a historic building that was torn down, covering the downtown of Mansfield in dust. Whether or not that dust contained asbestos is still a big question. The building that was torn down was the First Baptist Church, and it was built in 1911. The church has been vacant for many years, even after it was bought in 1982 by the Calhoun Family.

The property was renovated in 1994, “It was apartments,” Reimer Calhoun said. “Thirtyish apartments.” The state fire marshal’s office declared that the building was unsafe in 2011 and the buildings door were permanently closed. This last summer, the building was one of three that were demolished.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asbestos

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asbestos

The heat and dust caused an unbearable mess for all of the neighbors, “We would have dust that would blow over to my porch and the bushes and stuff,” Williamson, a local business owner said.

Another shop owner, Elsa Mims said, “It was mainly the dust that was bothering us. There was just so much dust out there and we were changing filters three times a week.”

After the people had reached their limit with the dust and the mess, they called in the Department of Environmental Quality. Greg Langley of the DEQ responded to these complaints in September. A notice of deficiency was issued and the DEQ tested the property for asbestos and the October 8th results came back positive.
Dr. Samer Nachawati, a Pulmonologist at Willis-Knighton, said that asbestos, “Can also lead to certain types of cancer. Mesothelioma is the most associated cancer with asbestos.”

Calhoun was asked why an inspection was not completed prior to construction and he responded that he did not know.
The contractor for the project, Scott Shelton, declined to be interviewed, but did state over the phone that asbestos had only been found in three places and that only two areas needed to be abated. This information was different than the reports from Langley at DEQ, whose department found asbestos in 8 places. Langley shut down the work they were doing until all of the asbestos could be removed safely from the property.

Dr. Nachawati said that he does not think there is a very big risk for any local business owner getting sick from the traveling dust, but also said the risk would be the greatest for the workers who were in direct contact with it. The effects of asbestos inhalation are not immediate and can actually take up to 40 years to develop.

“You can see the effects of asbestos 10 years, 20 years, 30 years up to 40 years actually down the line,” Dr. Nachawati said.

Mesothelioma is an aggressive cancer of the mesothelial tissue that is associated with asbestos exposure. The symptoms of this type of cancer include chest pain, a cough and shortness of breath, but since the latency period is so long, people may not know they have the illness for up to 40 years.

The town of Mansfield is just hoping that the project can now be finished correctly and safely from this point forward.

Asbestos in Crayons?

Posted on: July 22nd, 2015 by William Connelly

Parents are always worried about the health and safety of their children and are always looking out for what their children are putting into their mouths. Parents know that if a child can pick something up, there is a good chance it will go into their mouth at some point. Most children have played with crayons, at least at some point in their lives, and if there is asbestos in those crayons, it is just about the last thing you would want in your child’s mouth.

There was an investigation by public health watchdog, EWG Action Fund, and they found that some crayons that were sold in Australia contained this hazardous and deadly material. In addition, there were a few other toys that were shipped by online retailers that also contained asbestos.

The head of the Australian Border Force, which is the new agency that is merging customs and border control, has promised consumers that there will be backlash from this.

The few toys that were shipped out that contained asbestos include a necklace, several brands of crayons and a CSI-style science kit that has “forensic” powder. EWG senior analyst, Sonya Lunder, said, “We didn’t expect to find asbestos in crayons. But it’s there. The results are significant because even trace exposure to asbestos can cause cancer and other fatal lung diseases.”

The products that tested positive for asbestos were all made in China, and include:
• Amscan crayons
• Black fingerprint powder in the Toys R Us Eduscience Delux Forensics Lab kit
• Disney mickey mouse Clubhouse crayons by Greenbrier International Inc
• Nickelodeon Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle Crayons by MII Inc
• Saban’s Power Rangers Super Megaforce crayons by Greenbrier International Inc
• White fingerprint powder in the Buy-Rite Inside Intelligence Secret Spy kit

Both asbestos support groups and Australian unions are demanding tougher enforcement of the asbestos ban and call out how terrifying it is that children have been put at risk.

ACTU Assistant Secretary, Michael Borowick, is urging the Federal Government to increase ABF’s funding to “Ensure they are equipped to enforce the ban on asbestos.”

He also stated, “Asbestos has already killed many thousands of Australians, and sadly the full impact of asbestos-related diseases is not expected to peak until 2020.”

Roman Quaedvlieg, the ABF Commissioner, told The Australian that these hazardous and dangerous products were slipping “below the radar,” and he has promised to strength the force’s seizure efforts. However, he did admit that the agency has struggled with winning convictions, “because of the difficulty in terms of proving the source and the intent.”

The push for cracking down on manufacturing and selling toys that contain asbestos is gaining momentum and supporters are trying to get retailers to stop selling products that contain this hazardous and deadly material.

Man Receives Sentence for Lying About Removing Asbestos in Church

Posted on: July 22nd, 2015 by William Connelly

In Philadelphia, a Voorhees man received a prison sentence of one year and a day because he claimed that he had removed asbestos from a former church. This sentence came on Tuesday when it was determined that the man never actually did the work, according to the United States Department of Justice.

The 54 year old Ronen Bakshi, had submitted false documents to the City of Philadelphia’s Air Management Services office about the work that he supposedly did at a former church on 1133 Spring Garden Street. The project was to remove all materials from the church that contained asbestos.

Asbestos a very common material that was used in older homes and buildings because it was very durable and fire-resistant. If undisturbed, asbestos will most likely not cause any harm. However, asbestos removal is usually required if there is any construction being done of if the building is being demolished. An asbestos removal contractor should be hired to ensure that the work is done correctly and safely and that the hazardous materials are disposed of properly.

There are very strict requirements that the local, state and federal authorities have in regards to how asbestos is handled, removed and disposed of. Since this material is highly toxic and known to cause serious health problems, professionals are hired to make sure that there is full compliance will and state and federal laws/regulations.

The church had hired Bakshi to remove the asbestos in the building and he billed the non-profit owner of the property for the work, but the authorities said that he never actually removed the asbestos.

Bakshi pled guilty on March 18 to charges of falsifying records to obstruct a matter within the jurisdiction of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and wire fraud.

Bakshi has been ordered by U.S. District Court Judge Paul S. Diamond to start serving his year-long sentence right away. He has also imposed a fine of $30,000 on Bakshi, along with a $200 special assessment and after the prison term has been served, he will need to undergo a year of supervised release.

Lying about removing this hazardous material could have resulted in grave consequences. It is very fortunate that they found out that this work had not taken place, so the owner of the property can take the steps to now remove the hazardous material properly and safely.

Drug Used to Treat Lymphoma May Help to Kill Mesothelioma Cells

Posted on: March 9th, 2015 by William Connelly

There are some patients who suffer from mesothelioma who may be able to use the drug, Adcetris, which is currently being utilized to treat patients with large-cell lymphoma and Hodgkin’s disease. This new development comes from a recent identification of a protein called CD30 that is in a small percentage of mesothelioma cell lines. This makes it a possible treatment for mesothelioma, which is a cancer caused by exposure to asbestos. Adcetris was first found by cancer researchers at Case Western Reserve University, which is located in Cleveland. Adcetris is able to slow down the grown of mesothelioma cells that are confined in CD30. The main researcher of Adcetris, Dr. Afhsin Dowlati, told Asbestos.com that this drug is, “Very, very active against these cells, and not active against the cells that did not express CD30.” Also, earlier this year, Molecular Cancer Therapeutics came out with a report that was entitled, “CD30 Is a Potential Therapeutic Target in Malignant Mesothelioma.”   lymphoma hodgkin's disease

 

Back in 2011, Adcetris was approved by the FDA under its accelerated approval program. The FDA received help in getting approval to use the drug for lymphoma treatment because of research that was conducted at the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, located in Miami.   CD30 works because of its interaction with smaller proteins and it acts like a regulator of apoptosis (also known as programmed cell death). Adcetris is an antibody-drug that has been designed to target CD30 and change how it reacts.     Being a prominent mesothelioma research facility, Case Western began by testing 83 mesothelioma tumor specimens and they discovered that in 13 of them, CD30 was present. All 13 samples were the epithelioid subtype, which comprise over half of mesothelioma cell lines. They targeted this cell line and had very good results. The two other subtypes of mesothelioma are biphasic and sarcomatoid.

 

 

All three types are completely different in terms of their cell structure, size and shape.   Dowlati said that, “This is just a small step in the right direction. We believe that more profound studies need to be done in the clinic where CD30 can be targeted.”   Even though Adcetris is only effective against the small percentage of cell lines in which it was tested, it showed how progressive research is when it comes to mesothelioma and how doctors are doing what they can to come up with new and innovative treatment options for patients who suffer from it. ”   All patients aren’t created equal. Mesothelioma isn’t all the same. You identify subtypes, and try to find what works for each one,” Dowlati said. “Different types can be treated in different ways. It’s a very old concept in medicine, but in oncology, it’s really just come to fruition in the last decade. Instead of the same drug for everyone, cancer treatment has to be personalized.”   Mesothelioma is a cancer of the mesothelial tissue and is a cancer that is associated with people who were exposed to asbestos.

 

An estimated 3,000 Americans are diagnosed with mesothelioma each year and is most commonly diagnosed in men. In addition, most patients who are diagnosed are over the age of 65. Mesothelioma has an incredibly long latency period, so people who were exposed to asbestos many years ago may only now be experiencing symptoms. Some patients only live for six months after receiving the diagnosis, but there are also some patients who have lived for five years or longer.   There is not an explanation that oncologists can give for why one drug will work so well for a patient, and not so well for another. The type of research that Case Western is doing it exactly what is needed to answer this question. Dowlati warns people that, “We don’t know if this drug will work in the clinic. Just because something works in the laboratory, doesn’t mean it will work in the clinic. A lot of questions still need to be answered.”   Even so, it is encouraging to see this type of research and find new hope for those who suffer from mesothelioma.

Is Asbestos More Widespread Than We Thought?

Posted on: February 2nd, 2015 by William Connelly

Brenda Buck, a medical geologist at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, started to discover asbestos where it had never been before in 2011. She was studying the human health effects of mineral dusts at Nellis Dunes and was looking at how much natural arsenic was in the dust clouds that vehicles were kicking up when she noticed that there was something else in her samples too. She found palygorskite, which is a fibrous clay mineral that in some studies was found to be carcinogenic.

These discoveries of asbestos took place in Clark County, which is in southern Nevada, and they spread across the border into northwestern Arizona. This makes asbestos in these areas a lot more abundant than was earlier thought and these discoveries lead to questions about the health hazards that naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) can cause.
Buck contacted Francine Baumann, who is a cancer epidemiologist at the University of Hawaii Cancer Center and Baumann specializes in studying malignant mesothelioma cluster that have been caused by environmental exposures to fibrous minerals. This includes any needle-like fibers that are related to asbestos.

There are several different ways in which people can become exposure to mineral fibers, which include ingestion and inhalation. If the mineral fibers are inhaled, they can get lodged deep within the lung tissue and can then move to other organs in the body. This can cause an asbestos-related disease, such as mesothelioma.
In her studies, Baumann asked for Clark County and surrounding counties’ cancer data, and in her analysis she found that there were more women and young people who were suffering from mesothelioma than there should be for the general population.

It was surprising to find fibrous amphibole minerals (asbestos) in an environment that had never previously been known to produce asbestos. Before this discovery, there had only been five or six environments that were known to product asbestos and they were not in southern Nevada.

Brenda Buck, who is also the director of Environmental Soil Analysis Laboratory at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, now believes that this discovery means that other communities may also have the problem of being exposed to asbestos without even knowing it. She is also very concerned about how many asbestos-containing rocks they have found in Clark County. Many of those rocks are very close to schools and residential neighborhoods.

The reason that this has become a problem today is that these areas of asbestos-containing rocks are right in the way of a planned major highway construction project. The planned construction project would be building a new Boulder City Bypass. This construction project is stirring up debate over how much asbestos these rocks are putting into the air already and what starting a construction project on top of them would mean in terms of stirring up new dust. There is also great debate over the health hazards for the public and how or if this project should proceed.

How to Renovate Your Home Safely if it Contains Asbestos

Posted on: December 9th, 2014 by William Connelly

Asbestos was very commonly used in home construction until as late as the 1980s.  Many builders used asbestos because it was very fire resistant and was inexpensive.  Once the ill effects of asbestos were realized, the United States started to put band on utilizing.  This was discovered in the 1970s and now, asbestos is no longer being used to construct homes.  However, there are many older homes that still have asbestos-containing materials in them.

 

Many people enjoy updating and renovating their home and if your home has asbestos-containing materials in it, you need to be extremely careful.  Asbestos becomes very dangerous when it is disturbed.  Although you may not like the idea of having asbestos in your home, when it is not disturbed, it will most likely not cause any health problems for you.

 

When the asbestos fibers are disturbed, harmful dust is released into the air and can then be inhaled.  If you experience a prolonged exposure and if you inhale a good amount of asbestos dust, you could be at risk for developing mesothelioma, a type of cancer that is caused from exposure to asbestos.

 

It is unsafe to remove asbestos without the help of a trained professional.  The Environmental Protection Agency recommends using an accredited asbestos professional if you believe that your home might contain asbestos.  It is important to think of the health risks, not only to yourself, but to your family and neighbors as well.  It is your responsibility to ensure that you are not releasing asbestos fibers into the air during any home renovations.

 

There are some things that you should avoid when renovating an area that has asbestos-containing materials.  You never want to scrape, sand, saw or drill holes into any asbestos materials and 240 volt power tools should never be utilized since they are extremely likely to release fibers into the air.  You also never want to start a home project in which you will be removing or repairing asbestos material without first becoming informed on how to do this work appropriately.  You will never want to dispose of asbestos waste in your normal garbage and you should never re-use or recycle any products that contain asbestos.

 

If you are removing an asbestos sheet, there are precautions that you will need to take.  The area in which you are working should be completely sealed off with barrier tape to ensure that nobody enters the area who should not be there.  If possible, you will want to perform the work in an area that is well-ventilated.  You will need to wear disposable coveralls and a P2 respirator while doing the work and any asbestos material that is being removed should be wet down first.  You should do your best to avoid damaging or breaking the bonded asbestos and plastic drop sheets should be placed down.  When you are finished with the work, the disposable coveralls should be thrown away and your shoes should be completely wiped down.  You will also want to shower to ensure that there is not any asbestos dust or fibers on your skin or hair.

 

If you use an accredited asbestos professional for your home renovations and if you are knowledgeable about the risks and precautions that you should take before starting your home project, you should be able to complete the project without causing any harm to yourself or to your family.  Asbestos is a very dangerous material, but if handled appropriately, it will minimize or completely eliminate any health risks.

Alternatives to Asbestos

Posted on: April 7th, 2014 by William Connelly

Asbestos is a natural fiber that can be woven into fabrics, and is used in fire-resistant and insulating materials.  Asbestos was used for many years in insulation, floor tiling, asbestos roof sheeting, brake pads and siding.  Contractors commonly used asbestos products because the products were durable and extremely resistant to heat.  Asbestos was first used in 1900 in the U.S., and during the 1940s, asbestos was used abundantly in schools, public buildings and homes.  The asbestos-containing materials were used to fireproof, soundproof and insulate.

Asbestos becomes extremely dangerous when it is released into the air.  The asbestos fibers can enter your body in one of three ways:

  • Inhalation-The most common way that asbestos enters the body.  If you breathe air that has asbestos-containing fibers in it, you can become exposed to the critical illnesses that asbestos causes.
  • Ingestion-You can ingest asbestos fibers from drinking water.
  • Through your Skin-It is very rare, but asbestos fibers that come into contact with your skin can pass through the skin into your body.

The U. S. government has taken some actions on asbestos usage, but they have not banned using asbestos completely.  In 1989, there was a ban on asbestos containing products, but most of the bans were overturned in 1991.

Connelly & Vogelzang LLC know the dangers of using asbestos, and are dedicated to helping clients who have suffered from illnesses and diseases that asbestos causes.  There is no need to use asbestos when there are excellent alternatives to use instead.  Many of the alternatives are “green” products that are safe for the environment and for the people who are around them.

Asbestos alternatives include:

  • Amorphous Silica Fabrics-The amorphous silica fabrics are high temperature materials that are used for insulation and protection applications in industries like shipyards, electrical power generation and aerospace.  These fabrics are not usually used for residential projects since the fabrics do contain fiberglass.
  • Cellulose Fiber-This is one of the most popular alternatives to asbestos.  Cellulose insulation is made from finely shredded newsprint and is chemically treated to reduce most and increase its resistance to fire.  This is another excellent “green” option, since the cellulose fiber is typically 85% recycled material.  Around 15% of new green buildings that are built in the U.S. are using this alternative.  It may reduce your energy costs by around 20% per year.
  • Flour Fillers-There are crack and crevice fillers and extenders that are made completely out of natural materials and help with insulation.  These products may include pecan shell flour, wheat flour, rice flour, or rice hull ash.  This completely natural product is an excellent “green” option that has no safety hazards to anyone who is exposed to them.
  • Polyurethane Foam- This is a spray product that is most commonly used in roofing materials, but is also found in floatation devices and in the design of movie theater sets.  It is a water-based spray that is a wonderful choice for homeowners who have allergies, since it forms a tight seal that leaves very little space for mold or dust.  The product’s manufacturers claim that polyurethane foam products can reduce your energy costs by 30%-35% per year.  This product must be installed by a certified professional.
  • Thermoset Plastic Flour-A very common alternative to asbestos, thermoset plastic flour is made by heating a liquid or powder and molding it into the shape you want.  These products can be filled with wood flour or other low-priced fillers which will reduce your cost and provide you with great insulation.  These product’s uses range from electrical insulation to auto parts.

Alternatives to asbestos are being used all throughout the United States, and it is drastically cutting down on the amount of asbestos containing products being utilized.  It is still critical to be careful not to disturb building materials in older homes and buildings though, since many older homes and buildings contain asbestos products. Before beginning a major home product that could disturb asbestos, you should consult with a certified specialist.

Alternatives to Asbestos

Posted on: March 18th, 2014 by William Connelly

Asbestos is a natural fiber that can be woven into fabrics, and is used in fire-resistant and insulating materials.  Asbestos was used for many years in insulation, floor tiling, asbestos roof sheeting, brake pads and siding.  Contractors commonly used asbestos products because the products were durable and extremely resistant to heat.  Asbestos was first used in 1900 in the U.S., and during the 1940s, asbestos was used abundantly in schools, public buildings and homes.  The asbestos-containing materials were used to fireproof, soundproof and insulate.

Asbestos becomes extremely dangerous when it is released into the air.  The asbestos fibers can enter your body in one of three ways:

  • Inhalation-The most common way that asbestos enters the body.  If you breathe air that has asbestos-containing fibers in it, you can become exposed to the critical illnesses that asbestos causes.
  • Ingestion-You can ingest asbestos fibers from drinking water.
  • Through your Skin-It is very rare, but asbestos fibers that come into contact with your skin can pass through the skin into your body.

The U. S. government has taken some actions on asbestos usage, but they have not banned using asbestos completely.  In 1989, there was a ban on asbestos containing products, but most of the bans were overturned in 1991.

Connelly & Vogelzang LLC know the dangers of using asbestos, and are dedicated to helping clients who have suffered from illnesses and diseases that asbestos causes.  There is no need to use asbestos when there are excellent alternatives to use instead.  Many of the alternatives are “green” products that are safe for the environment and for the people who are around them.

Asbestos alternatives include:

  • Amorphous Silica Fabrics-The amorphous silica fabrics are high temperature materials that are used for insulation and protection applications in industries like shipyards, electrical power generation and aerospace.  These fabrics are not usually used for residential projects since the fabrics do contain fiberglass.
  • Cellulose Fiber-This is one of the most popular alternatives to asbestos.  Cellulose insulation is made from finely shredded newsprint and is chemically treated to reduce most and increase its resistance to fire.  This is another excellent “green” option, since the cellulose fiber is typically 85% recycled material.  Around 15% of new green buildings that are built in the U.S. are using this alternative.  It may reduce your energy costs by around 20% per year.
  • Flour Fillers-There are crack and crevice fillers and extenders that are made completely out of natural materials and help with insulation.  These products may include pecan shell flour, wheat flour, rice flour, or rice hull ash.  This completely natural product is an excellent “green” option that has no safety hazards to anyone who is exposed to them.
  • Polyurethane Foam- This is a spray product that is most commonly used in roofing materials, but is also found in floatation devices and in the design of movie theater sets.  It is a water-based spray that is a wonderful choice for homeowners who have allergies, since it forms a tight seal that leaves very little space for mold or dust.  The product’s manufacturers claim that polyurethane foam products can reduce your energy costs by 30%-35% per year.  This product must be installed by a certified professional.
  • Thermoset Plastic Flour-A very common alternative to asbestos, thermoset plastic flour is made by heating a liquid or powder and molding it into the shape you want.  These products can be filled with wood flour or other low-priced fillers which will reduce your cost and provide you with great insulation.  These product’s uses range from electrical insulation to auto parts.

Alternatives to asbestos are being used all throughout the United States, and it is drastically cutting down on the amount of asbestos containing products being utilized.  It is still critical to be careful not to disturb building materials in older homes and buildings though, since many older homes and buildings contain asbestos products. Before beginning a major home product that could disturb asbestos, you should consult with a certified specialist.

U. S. Senate Passes Resolution Designating the 10th Annual “National Asbestos Awareness Week”

Posted on: March 11th, 2014 by William Connelly

Thanks to a resolution passed by the U.S. Senate, the first week of April is designated as “National Asbestos Awareness Week.”  Connelly & Vogelzang LLC sends our thanks to Senator Max Baucus, who led the effort to pass Senate Resolution 336, which helped raise public awareness to the dangers of asbestos exposure and how common diseases that stem from exposure to asbestos are.

National Asbestos Awareness Week has taken place during the first week of April since 2005.  The entire week is dedicated to educating the general population about asbestos exposure.  The use of asbestos in the United States has not been completely banned, and there are many people who do not know about the harmful and life-threatening diseases that result from exposure.  Mesothelioma and asbestosis are just two of the severe diseases that one can develop from exposure to asbestos.

Every year, 2,000-3,000 Americans are diagnosed with mesothelioma.  The three primary types of mesothelioma are pleural mesothelioma, pericardial mesothelioma and peritoneal mesothelioma.  Mesothelioma is a fatal type of cancer that is caused by asbestos exposure.  When asbestos is disturbed, it gets released into the air and can become extremely toxic.  If the asbestos fibers are inhaled, they can get into your lungs and serious illnesses can result.

The latency period of this rare type of cancer is very long.  It generally takes 25-50 years after initial exposure to asbestos for the symptoms of mesothelioma to develop.  The National Institutes of Health (NIH) estimates that that were approximately 11 million people who were exposed to asbestos between 1940 and 1978.  Unfortunately, this cancer is usually fatal and there is no cure.

Connelly & Vogelzang LLC understand how important National Asbestos Week is for awareness to terrible diseases that result from using asbestos, and it is also a wonderful way that members of the mesothelioma community can come together to educate the public about dangers of asbestos usage.

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) is the driving force behind National Asbestos Awareness Week, and they are the biggest, independent, non-profit organization who is dedicated to advocating for anyone who was affected by an asbestos-related disease.  They continue to fight for a ban on asbestos usage in the United States to help eliminate mesothelioma and other asbestos-related diseases.

The ADAO will host the 10th Annual International Asbestos Awareness Conference from April 4-6 at the Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, VA.  There will be over 30 renowned medical experts and victims from asbestos from 10 countries who will be speaking about new treatments for asbestos-related diseases, new advancements in asbestos disease prevention and how to put a global ban on asbestos.

For more information about National Asbestos Awareness Week, or the ADAO, you can visit http://www.asbestosdiseaseawareness.org/

Connelly&Vogelzang Earns Better Business Bureau Accreditation

Posted on: March 11th, 2013 by William Connelly

Becoming an Accredited Business with the Better Business Bureau is an honor not accorded to all businesses; because not all businesses meet eligibility standards.  Connelly & Vogelzang is pleased to announce today that it has met all BBB Standards and is now an Accredited Business.

“Accreditation in the BBB is by invitation only” says Steve J. Bernas, president & CEO of the Better Business Bureau serving Chicago and Northern Illinois. “And only those businesses that meet our high standards, and pass the review process are approved by our Board of Directors.”

As with all businesses that are accredited by the BBB, Connelly & Vogelzang has committed to the BBB Code of Business Practices. The Code is a comprehensive set of policies, procedures and best practices on how businesses treat clients. These standards call for building trust, embodying integrity, advertising honestly and being truthful. Bernas adds “To maintain their Accreditation a business must be transparent, honor their promises, be responsive to their clients, and safeguard their privacy.”

“We are proud to be a BBB Accredited Business,” said Nicholas Vogelzang. “In today’s world it is imperative that our clients know how seriously we take our commitment to excellence and good representation.” he adds “Our achieving BBB Accreditation exemplifies that goal.”